Water Quality Summary

A good way to gauge the health of Galveston Bay is to assess the levels of life-sustaining nutrients and oxygen. A lack of balance in these nutrients can cause algae blooms that deplete oxygen and even kill marine life. The levels of nutrients and dissolved oxygen found in the 2015 samples were most often at acceptable levels for supporting diverse and healthy aquatic life. However, the issues that exist are primarily due to runoff and wastewater from human activity.

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What We Can do

Nitrogen

Nitrogen is important to the Bay because it stimulates plant growth. But too much nitrogen can cause an algae bloom, which can deplete oxygen in the water and kill marine life. In 2015, nitrogen concentrations were above state standards in 7 percent of samples collected from Galveston Bay, and 12 percent of samples collected from the rivers and bayous surrounding Galveston Bay.

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Nitrogen in Water

Nitrogen levels have been steadily improving in recent years. How did Galveston Bay’s levels fare this year?

What We Can do

Keep Excess Nitrogen Out of Our Waterways

  • Follow fertilizer directions carefully and don’t overfertilize. Going organic is a great way to reduce the amount of fertilizer you use!
  • Leave as much of your property unpaved as possible.
  • Plant a rain garden that collects rainwater and allows it to soak into the soil.
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Galveston Bay Nitrogen

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Rivers and Bayous Nitrogen

Be frugal with water and fertilizer use – Don’t fertilize your local waterway

Phosphorus

Phosphorus, like nitrogen, is a nutrient that stimulates plant growth. But too many nutrients can lead to algae blooms, which can deplete oxygen in the water and kill aquatic life. Unfortunately, in 2015, phosphorus concentrations were above state screening levels in 14 percent of samples collected from Galveston Bay, and 34 percent of samples collected from the rivers and bayous surrounding the Bay.

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Phosphorus in Water

Did you know phosphorus from detergents and plant fertilizer can harm aquatic habitats around the Bay? Find out how you can help.

What We Can do

Keep Excess Phosphorus Out of Our Waterways

  • Use phosphate-free or phosphate-reduced laundry, dish, and car-washing soaps.
  • Incorporate landscaping techniques that require less fertilizer, like growing a garden with native plants.
  • Control erosion. Phosphorus attaches to soil particles, making erosion a contributor to phosphorus pollution.
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Galveston Bay Phosphorus

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Rivers and Bayous Phosphorus

Water sparingly and apply the correct amount of fertilizer to reduce lawn care cost

Dissolved Oxygen

Adequate oxygen levels are required to support aquatic life in Galveston Bay. Hypoxia (low-oxygen) and anoxia (no-oxygen) zones are common after large algae blooms in water that is warm, still, and has poor clarity. Benthic (bottom-dwelling) organisms can’t escape or survive in hypoxic conditions. In 2015, dissolved oxygen levels were below state screening levels in less than one percent of samples collected from Galveston Bay, and 3 percent of samples collected from the rivers and bayous surrounding the Bay.

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Dissolved Oxygen in Water

Aquatic life, including fish and shellfish, requires oxygen to survive. How are the Bay’s watersheds doing?

What We Can do

Our Actions Impact Oxygen Levels

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Galveston Bay Dissolved Oxygen

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Tributary Dissolved Oxygen

Essential for your favorite fishing hole

Want more? Check the grades on other Indicators.

Overview
Water Quality
Pollution Events & Sources
Habitat
Wildlife
Human Health Risk
Coastal Change